ENDOVASCULAR TREATMENT FOR TOTALLY IMPLANTABLE CENTRAL VENOUS ACCESS DEVICE-RELATED SUPERIOR VENA CAVA SYNDROME — CASE REPORT

  • Miguel Fróis Borges Serviço de Cirurgia Geral do Hospital Garcia de Orta; Clínica Universitária de Cirurgia I da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa
  • Filipa Clara Eiró Serviço de Cirurgia Geral do Hospital Garcia de Orta
  • Ana Afonso Serviço de Cirurgia Vascular do Hospital Garcia de Orta
  • Hugo Rodrigues Serviço de Cirurgia Vascular do Hospital Garcia de Orta
  • António Gonzalez Serviço de Cirurgia Vascular do Hospital Garcia de Orta
  • Gil Marques Serviço de Cirurgia Vascular do Hospital Garcia de Orta
  • Maria José Barbas Serviço de Cirurgia Vascular do Hospital Garcia de Orta
Keywords: Superior vena cava syndrome, Totally implantable vascular access device, Late complications, Endovascular treatment

Abstract

Introduction: Benign superior vena cava syndrome (SVCs) is rare and may be related to a totally implantable vascular access device (TIVAD). In the past 20 years, percutaneous endovascular placement of a stent has been rising as a viable option for SVCs treatment.

Case Report: We report the case of a 42-year-old woman with the diagnosis of classical Hodgkin lymphoma who presented a SVCs one year after placement of a TIVAD. After failure of conservative treatment, we placed an auto-expansible stent through the TIVAD with good radiologic and clinical result.

Conclusion: Endovascular treatment for TIVAD-related SVCs is safe and may be considered a first line approach.

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Author Biography

Miguel Fróis Borges, Serviço de Cirurgia Geral do Hospital Garcia de Orta; Clínica Universitária de Cirurgia I da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa

Cirurgia

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Published
2017-12-30
Section
Clinical Case