SMART GLASSES: DO THEY HAVE A ROLE IN THE ANGIOGRAPHY SUITE?

  • Carlos Veiga Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar Universitário do Porto
  • Luis Loureiro Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar Universitário do Porto; Grupo de Estudos Vasculares (GEV), Portugal
  • Gabriela Teixeira Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar Universitário do Porto; Grupo de Estudos Vasculares (GEV), Portugal
  • Ines Antunes Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar Universitário do Porto; Grupo de Estudos Vasculares (GEV), Portugal
  • Daniel Mendes Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar Universitário do Porto; Grupo de Estudos Vasculares (GEV), Portugal
  • Paulo Almeida Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar Universitário do Porto; Grupo de Estudos Vasculares (GEV), Portugal
  • Carolina Vaz Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar Universitário do Porto, Portugal
  • Rui Almeida Serviço de Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular, Centro Hospitalar Universitário do Porto, Portugal
  • António Norton de Matos Grupo de Estudos Vasculares (GEV), Portugal
Keywords: Smart Glasses, Ergonomics, Interventional Radiology, Angiography

Abstract

Introduction: The ergonomic stress associated with performing endovascular procedures leads vascular surgeons to frequently assume a set of postures and movements for image control. This results in an increased long-term risk of devel- oping musculoskeletal pathology. The use of smart glasses may play a role in reducing this risk, allowing the professional to control the procedure without the need for constant repositioning. Through the application of the Quick Exposure Check (QEC) questionnaire, we compared the ergonomic risk during endovascular procedures with and without the use of smart glasses.

Methods: The QEC was applied by an external observer during endovascular procedures with and without the use of a pair of Epson Moverio BT-35E® smart glasses. The two groups of procedures were compared in relation to total QEC score and partial scores that assessed the risk for different anatomic segments (cervical spine, lumbar spine, shoulder / arm and wrist/hand). The partial self-perceived stress and work rhythm scores, evaluated by the professional, were also compared.

Results: The QEC was applied to a total of 12 procedures. The procedures with the use of smart glasses (n=6) obtained a significantly lower average total score in the QEC (83.7 — low ergonomic risk) compared to the procedures without using smart glasses (108.3 — moderate ergonomic risk; p = 0.009). The average partial scores for cervical and lumbar spine were also significantly lower in this group (lumbar: 11.3 vs 18; p = 0.002) (cervical: 18 vs 26.7; p = 0.002). No statistically significant differences were found in the average partial scores for the shoulder/arm and wrist/hand, nor for the partial scores of self-perceived stress and work rhythm.

Conclusion: The use of smart glasses during endovascular surgery was shown to reduce the ergonomic risk, assessed by the QEC scale, from moderate to low. This reduction is mainly due to a reduction in the risk of musculoskeletal disorders at the level of the spine and neck.

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Published
2019-12-27
Section
Original Article

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